Sunday, 22 June 2014

Menial Jobs are Dragging Peru Down

From canstockphoto.com
When countries shift towards first world economies they move from being primarily manufacturing economies to being service economies. While manufacturing does help the economy it has a negative impact on the environment and people's lifestyles. Countries can change rapidly when changes are made. The USA has led the way in becoming a service sector and as a result people's lives have dramatically increased. If you think that a short while ago there were no child labor laws, slave wages, and sweat shops were commonplace.

Certain stereotypes exist about menial job workers in the US and one is language. Since many immigrants are from Mexico, some people look down on those who speak Spanish. Whether they like it or not, Spanish is becoming a very important language not only in the USA, but also in the world. Learning Spanish will help you assimilate to the culture and you'll be able to communicate easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, Fluenz Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Synergy Spanish.

While Peru isn't well known as a manufacturing company, no cars are made there, few electronic are, many items are imported from China. However, menial jobs are to Peru as manufacturing was to the USA.  Some of these menial jobs include:
  • fare takers (cobradores) on the buses
  • gas attendants
  • street vendors
  • people who sell things on buses
  • shoe shine kids
  • live-in nannies
  • the people who shout numbers out to the bus drivers to let them know about their competition

Peru has come a long way in recent years. Fujimori's gone. As is the Shining Path. But there are still many obstacles in the way keeping Peru from becoming a developed country.



The Ultimate Peru List recommends:

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