Sunday, 9 November 2008

Family and Marriage Visas for Peru

Updated 5 September 2013

 ***Be sure you ask at immigrations about your visa as rules and fees seem to change often. You now need an appointment in order to go to immigration. Make the "derecho de tramite" payment in order to schedule your appointment right away.***

One tip to remember is that speaking Spanish will help you greatly. You'll be treated differently than if you speak English all the time, it'll help you assimilate to Peru, and it'll make talking to the immigration officers easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, I recommend Synergy Spanish and Speak From Day 1.


According to Peruvian law, you CAN earn money while on this visa. So there's no problem if you want to get a job. You can find info in Spanish at DIGEMIN. It's called "llamado de familia".

This visa is for

  • underage children of Peruvians (if the children don't have Peruvian citizenship)
  • parents of Peruvian children
  • parents of special ed Peruvian children
  • people who are married to a Peruvian or immigrants.

Getting Married in Peru
If you're not married yet, but are planning on getting married in Peru, you can find the steps here in the Marriage Section. The information below is for those who are married. For all other cases, you will have to do the same things, except instead of a marriage license, you'll have to show birth certificates to prove they you are related. Check with immigrations for a complete list of what you need. Either call them or go in person. Make sure to documents apostillised and translated if necessary.

Check here for personal stories about getting marriage visas. For those of you married to a Peruvian, you can get a resident visa that allows you to work in Peru. If you're not married yet, but are planning on getting married in Peru, you can find the steps here in the Marriage Section. It takes about two months to get. You no longer have to leave the country to pick up a residence visa. All the paperwork can now be done in Lima. You will also get a carne de extranjeria (foreign resident card / CE) which is proof of residency. You have to renew it yearly and pay the yearly foreigner's tax. After two years of residency, you can become a Peruvian citizen. There are two ways to get the visa, depending on where you got married.

Name Change

If you change your name and get a new passport, you MUST transfer your visa from your old passport to your new passport. You cannot just simply leave on a completely new passport. The only exception would be for Peruvians.

For bank accounts, you just go to the bank with your bank card and DNI. Same goes for your pension plan. For propery you'll have to go to SUNARP and bring a letter explaining the change as well as notarised copies of your documents. You have to show your old name and new name. So you could bring your old and new CE, or your old CE and your new DNI and Naturalisation paper. You'll also have to fill out a form. You'll also need your original partida de matrimonio (marriage license) and a notarised copy of your spouse's DNI.

Do one of these
If you got married outside of Peru, you've got a couple of steps to take. You will have to register it in the country where you got married (probably at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs) and then go to the Peruvian consulate / embassy and register it with them. They will then give you a Peruvian marriage certificate. Do this quickly as possible because there may be a time limit. If possible, get a couple marriage certificates. You will need a new marriage certificate every year   in order to renew residency.

Ask them if your marriage will be registered with RENIEC. If it will not be registered with RENIEC, then you will also have to do that when you get here. When you come to Peru, you have between 30 and 90 days to register your marriage depening on the person you talk to. It will have to be apostillised; see Peru and the Hague Agreement for more info. It will also have to be translated by a certified translator, if not in Spanish (see Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores (RREE) and do a search for traductores oficiales). Then go to RENIEC and register your marriage if it hasn't already been registered. Then you have to do everything above that people who got married in Peru have to do. For letters, go to Letters for Immigrations.


OR

1. If you got married in Peru, you need either your Partida de Matrimonio or your Acta de Matrimonio, which must be legalized by RENIEC. In order to legalise your document, first you need to go to the Banco de la Nacion and pay 17 soles.

Everyone Must Do This

  • Form F007
  • Form F004 (to change the status of your visa. If you have a tourist visa, mark the first box. If you have a different visa, you'll have to fill out the blanks at the top.
  • Pay the fees for the forms (F004 is code 01814), the annual foreigner’s tax, and to do the paperwork. 
  • Copy of your passport
  • Copy of your visa or entry stamp into Peru
  • Original TAM (Tarjeta Andina de Migraciones). This is the little white paper you get when you enter Peru.
  • Orginal passport
Your spouse needs to give you the following
  • Your spouse will have to sign a document in the presence of a public notary saying that they will financially support you while you are in Peru. (see Letters for Immigrations.)
  • Photocopy of their DNI with casado/a status. They MUST change their civil status so that it says that they are married.

  1.  Make copies of everything so that they can stamp your copies. Leave the originals at the Mesa de Partes at Immigrations come back when they tell you to. They will probably tell you to call or email them in 15 days to check the status of your CE.
  2. While you're waiting, go to INTERPOL Steps can be found here.
  3. In theory, you no longer have to leave the country to pick up a residence visa. All the paperwork can now be done in Lima.
  4. Pick up your visa, bring copies of your passport and 2 passport photos. Call ahead and ask how much the visa will be. You'll also need a carne sized photo when you pick up the visa.
  5. Then, follow the steps to get your carne de extranjeria.

The Ultimate Peru List recommends:

61 comments:

  1. question--can one work on a marriage visa? does the C.E. allow one to work? or does one need a work visa? thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yep. A marriage visa, llamado de familia, allows you to get a CE and a resident visa. You can work on it. BUT, some companies give you less benefits. For example, at a school I worked at, all those who had work visas were given flights home. THose of us with marriage visas weren't.

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  3. I was wondering if there is such a thing as a resident visa for unmarried foreign parents in Peru. My daughter was born and lives in Peru with now also two years. Is there a way for the father to obtain a resident visa for ease of extended visits. As currently only has the visa of a tourist.

    Any advice would be most appreciated. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yes, you can. It's the same visa that is given for those married to a Peruvian. It's called a llamada de familia visa. My guess would be that you would need to show your daughter's birth cert in order to prove that you're related to her. I would check with immigrations to make sure.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I thought I'd pass this along.

    I just got back from DIGIMEN after applying for a change in Visa status due to marrying a Peruvian. I did not have to pay either the $200 or $20 fee you mentioned as being married to a Peruvian exempts you. Nor did I have to file a Form 007 asking for the exemption. The fee I did have to pay was about $58 paid at the Banco de Nacion to file the paperwork for the Form 004. I was told to call in 15 days (at the desk Mesa de s downstairs)but at Window 7 on the 3rd floor the lady there gave me their email address to use. I also did the INTERPOL stuff a few days ago (before even going to DIGIMEN) and had to pay S/. 10.00 for them to take a photo.

    One other thing, I didn't bring a manila envelope and found out they had them there and do not charge for them.

    ReplyDelete
  6. What can I say? This is Peru.

    First, because you married a Peruvian, you DON'T have to pay the fee. It says it here:
    http://www.digemin.gob.pe/inm_ccm_mostrar.asp

    Recibo de pago del Banco de la Nación de la tasa por cambio de calidad migratoria a visa temporal (US$ 50,00), o a Residente:(US$ 200,00), o a Inmigrante (US$ 300,00). (Cancelable a la aprobación del expediente)
    * Se encuentran exoneradas del pago de la tasa de extranjería las personas que se encuentran comprendidas dentro de los alcances del artículo 3º del DS Nº 206-83-EFC.

    You're extempt because you're married to a Peruvian.

    I wouldn't be surprised if they changed the way things are done. Thanks for the update. I'll fix my info
    Sharon

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi,

    First of all; great site, very informative!

    I'm dutch and married (in the Netherlands) to a peruvian woman. We have been told to register our marriage certificate at the dutch ministery of foreign affairs and after that by the peruvian consulate. Then they register it and provide us with a peruvian partida de matrimonio.
    The text above says: (option 1 for married couples outside Peru). First registar at Reniec THEN at the peruvian consulate. That sounds very complicated. Or can I assume that by getting the partida de matrimonio from the peruvian consulate, our marriage is then also registered at Reniec?

    ReplyDelete
  8. No, you will still have to register it here in Peru. If the Peruvian Embassy has told you to do that, then try that. The only thing that I can say about Peru is that nothing is written in stone. Rules change as often as the weather.

    Also, this is for those wanting to live in Peru.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi, I live in the United States and I had my peruvian fiance come here on a marriage visa. We got married here in the usa. Would we have to get married in Peru in order for me to get residence there too? I would like to live in Peru with her. thanks

    ReplyDelete
  10. No, you wouldn't. But you have to register your marriage with the Peruvian govt. ASk at your nearest consulate for more info.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I'm a US citizen going through this process RIGHT now after marrying a Peruvian a month ago.

    This is the latest info, straight from DIGEMIN:

    First, present all of this together at DIGEMIN (av. Espanya in Brena).

    1. Form F-004
    2. Pay S/. 58.93 to code 01814 at Banco de la Nacion (on the first floor of Migraciones on Av. Espanya)
    3. Simple photocopy of the data page AND the entry stamp page of your passport
    4. Your tarjeta andina de migraciones (ORIGINAL)
    5. Carta de Garantia (the last part about calidad migratoria is if you came in on a tourist visit and now want to stay.)

    CARTA DE GARANTIA
    Señor Director General de Migraciones y Naturalización

    S.D.
    Yo, [name of Peruvian] identificado con DNI No [_______] con domicilio actual en _____________________, distrito de __________, provincia de __________, departamento de _________, garantizo moral y económicamente a mi espos[o/a] ________ de nacionalidad __________ con pasaporte No ______________ para el trámite de cambio de calidad migratoria.

    Lima, el __ de __ del ______

    [signature]________________________
    Name
    DNI Number

    6. Photocopy of spouse's DNI with the NEW status of married (so you will have to do that tramite with the RENIEC before.)

    7. If you got married in Peru, the acta de Matrimonio "original y actualizada"; if you con married abroad, orginal "acta de matrimonio, inscrita y legalizado" at the Peruvian consulate in that country AND at the Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores in Lima.

    Step 2 is: Interpol, after paying S/. 72.80
    Step 3 is: you get your Carne de Extranjeria.

    ReplyDelete
  12. ok, thanks so much. It's pretty much the same it was before. You didn't have to pay 200 dollars to change your visa status? That's odd.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi,
    Thanks for all the invaluable information.
    I'm married to a Peruvian and am about to go to Lima ( I live in Ayacucho) to go through the process of changing my visa status.
    As my wedding took place in Peru, do I have to have my partida de matrimonio legalized by the MFR or the RENIEC?? I rang the Digemin a few times to know and they always give me different answers to the question.
    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  14. YOu need to have your partida legalised by RENIEC. That can be done at any RENIEC: We were married in Piura and I always legalised it in Lima. It takes a week or so.

    FYI, you'll need a new one every year with the stamp from the current year. So next year in 2011, when you renew your CE, you'll have to get another partida printed with 2011 on it.

    And do that every year. This is one reason why it's not worth doing the exoneration from the foreigner's tax. Just pay the 20 bucks, it's easier

    After two years, you can get citizenship or permanent residency. Even though I hated living in Peru the last couple years I was there, I got citizenship, now I'm in Korea and have a Peruvian passport, and US one, and can go back any time to live in Peru, provided the quality of life goes up, a lot.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I wanna know how I can work in Peru.

    ReplyDelete
  16. If you're married and have a visa, just apply for jobs. YOu can find them at
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/perujobbulletin/
    www.expatperu.com
    www.livinginperu.com

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi! I have a half brother who was born and lives in Peru (from my dad's side.) My dad was born in Peru, but is now a US Citizen. Can I become a Peruvian Citizen easily or will it be difficult?

    ReplyDelete
  18. It will be more difficult because you're an adult, but it's still doable. Contact your nearest embassy for info.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I registered our marriage at the Peruvian Consulate in Miami, do I need the original print out they issued me or may I use a copy when issuing my paperwork?

    ReplyDelete
  20. I'd show the original. BUt don't hand it over to them. Make copies and then go to a notary (notario) and get them legalised / notarised. It costs about 3 soles.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi Sharon, I found on the DIGEMIN website that spouses of Peruvians can work if they have a contract that's been approved by the Labor Ministry. What about recibos por honorarios? I translate, so I freelance...I'm married to a Peruvian but now I'm worried I still won't be able to have my own recibos or even start a company. Would I have to do that under a different visa?

    ReplyDelete
  22. If you have a CE, you can get to SUNAT and get recibos de honorarios. They're free. Ask about taxes though, if you make over 2500 soles a month or write ONE recibo for more than 1500, then you have to pay taxes.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi Sharon! Firstly, I love that there's a blog site dedicate to all things Peru. :) Ok, I was born in Lima but have lived in the states since age 2 and am now an American citizen. I have a HALF brother (from my father's side) living in Lima and would like to get a residential VISA for him. Do you know if I have any pull here being that I'm an American citizen AND his half-sister? Just wondering if this is even a possibility. Gracias! Hazel

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hey,
    Mm, you mean get him a US residential visa? Yes, I believe you still have pull. I think. I don't really know about US law. Have you tried visajourney.com ?

    ReplyDelete
  25. I'll check it out. Thank you for the site recommendation! Hazel

    ReplyDelete
  26. hi there i am a briish citizen married to a peruvian (of who i have a child with who was born in peru) was told that i can aply for a DNI as i'm married with a peruvian & have a child with her!

    is this true? as i keep being told diffrent things here in peru by diffrent people!
    i'm currently in peru on a tourist visa (wich is due to expire in two weeks) & an not intrested in a resident visa as i don't plan to stay any longer then a futher 6 months at most!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Nope. Not true. DNI means citizenship. A foreigner doesn't get British citizenship just by being married, they have to live in the UK (or their spouse has to be involved in service to the Queen abroad). First you'll need to get a PEB (married to a Peruvian) visa. Stay on that for 2 years, then apply for naturalisation, then apply for a DNI.

    So . . .why would you want a DNI if you don't want to stay there?

    ReplyDelete
  28. My boyfriend might be getting deported from the United States. I am a US citizen, and we are planning to get married. If he gets deported from the US, would I be able to go to Peru to live with him and marry him there? As for all of the paperwork that needs to be done, he would not be allowed to go to the US to do any of the paperwork. Since he would not be allowed back in the US, and I plan on residing in Peru, would we be able to get married legally there, and would I be able to get dual citizenship without him having to go to the US?

    ReplyDelete
  29. Why wouldn't you? YOu could also marry him in the US. A friend of mine did that in order to save him from getting deported. As far as dual citizenship for you, again, why couldn't you do it?

    He doesn't need to get paperwork from the US. You do.

    Living in Peru forever? Forever's a long time.

    ReplyDelete
  30. I am an africa native,im planning to get marry to peruvian lady but the documents requested for by peruvian law didnt get to me on time from my country.Now,i just got the documents now dated about 5 months ago and i read from one of your publicity that documents to be presented must not more than 90 days.what can i do about it?

    ReplyDelete
  31. I would ask the municipality where you're going to get married. Laws are flexible in Peru.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Hi Sharon,

    Thanks for this very informative blog. You're doing a great job!

    I was married to a Peruvian last year in Virginia (USA) while we were on vacation. I'm not American; I and my wife have been living in the Caribbean since. Lately, I've been thinking of working on my Peruvian naturalization. What would be the best course for this goal while essentially maintaining residence outside Peru? I'm willing to travel to Peru back and forth every, say, 6 months or so if that helps. I've read about the 183 days absence and its consequences, but I was wondering if there's a workaround to it.

    Thanks a lot!

    ReplyDelete
  33. You can't. You have to reside in Peru for 2 years first. You'll need to get a CE and keep it valid, meaning spending at least half the year physically present in Peru.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Are there any loopholes around the half the year requirement? My husband is Peruvian and we would like to spend just 3 months of the year in Peru....

    ReplyDelete
  35. If you spend more than 6 months out of Peru, you'll lose residency. Residency can take a couple months to get at the beginning. Why not just get a tourist visa? Most countries can get one upon arrival and it's good for up to 183 days.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Thank you for your blog it has proved helped for me. I do have some questions if you can help me.
    I am a us citizen getting married to a Peruvian here in Peru. And plan on staying here afterwards. The date is nov 24 2012. I was given a visa of 90 days so that gives me till nov 2nd. I was working towards a work contract but that didn't work out so I am wondering if by doing the wedding process I would be given more days till the wedding or do I have to leave the country for 2 weeks and then come back?
    Second question: I have a hard time understanding the documentation process. I have my birth certificate and divorce decree here with me in Peru but whether it's an offical copy or certificied I have no idea. So do I need to request another one in the states and have it notarized? And then have them send it to me have it offical translated and then have that legalized here in Peru to present it to them?

    Third: how do I have the states recognize my marriage here in Peru? Because I would like to take up his last name and change my visa for the states.
    Thank you again. I am sorry my situation is difficult. :(

    ReplyDelete
  37. Having a problem with your blog, trying to write a question to you

    ReplyDelete
  38. I get a lot of spam so all comments have to be approved.

    First, you can simply overstay the visa and pay the $1 fine, border hop, or change the wedding date. I don't believe they give extensions anymore since they started giving up to 183 days.

    Second, if there's a stamp or seal on your birth cert and divorce cert, then it's official. You need to send it to the Sec of State where it's from and they'll notarise it. Then find an official translator in Lima and they'll do the rest for you.

    Third, you can't register a foreign marriage in the US, you can only record it. You don't have to record it to change your name. Just bring your marriage cert to the embassy. You can change your name, passport, and SS card.

    Fourth, you said change your visa for the States, I don't understand what you're talking about. If you're a US citizen, you don't have a visa for the States.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Hello, any information regarding the possibility to obtain a residence visa for non married parents.
    I need the permission to work, invest and open banking accounts all as an independent.
    For information i have located, refers and states that it was once possible. However dates back to 2008.
    Any information regarding this type of situation would be greatly received.
    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  40. It's been updated 3 July 2012. You can also check on www.digemin.gob.pe and expatperu.com

    ReplyDelete
  41. Hi there,
    Considering that the years have changed, I am sure the process may be different. I am married to a peruvian man, and we got married in Lima, Peru. But here's the thing, I was on a tourist visa when we married and had to leave after the 183 days. I want to go back now to be with him and al of this seems quite difficult to understand. So, are you telling me now that I am in the United States and I go back I will have to be back on a tourist visa, then when I get there fill out the paperwork for this marriage visa? I can not get any of this done outside of Peru and basically have it all done when I get to Peru? Also we haven't been married for two years so am I even applicable to file for this visa?
    Thanks if you get time to answering my question

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep. Do the paperwork there. You don't have to be married for two years to get the marriage visa.

      Different consulates have different rules, so check with your nearest one. As far as I know, you have to do the paperwork there. It's not that hard since you have a Peruvian marriage cert already. Has your husband changed his DNI? If he is then it's a pretty straight-forward process. Shouldn't take long at all.

      Delete
  42. Hi there,
    I am currently reading this which ofcourse it is now 2013 and I am sure things may have changed especially for the filing processes maybe. But, here's my question. First of all I am married to a peruvian man, and we got married in Peru. Though when we got married I was on a tourist visa, then I had to return home to the United States. So, this time around I am wanting to go back and stay longer with him, and perhaps work in Lima. Is there any way I can file all this paperwork outside of Peru and here in the United States, or perhaps get my husband to file them for me while I am not down there, or do I have to file them while I am in Peru and still on a tourist visa? Also I am going to try to work as well down in Peru, should I get this done before then? Oh, and if I decide to buy a ticket I shouldnt make it one way right, since it has to be a tourist visa and they ask when you return, or is it ok? This seems terribly difficult! But, I suppose if I got through the process of getting married in Peru *which was hell* I think I can do this! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What's your nearest consulate / embassy? Have you contacted them? As I said before, each consulate has different rules about issuing visas.

      It really doesn't take a lot of time to get a marriage visa, especially since you were married in Peru. You'll get up to 183 days when you go there as a tourist and you can simply change from a tourist to a PEB (married to a Peruvian).

      You're right, you can't get a one way. So that leaves you a couple of options: buy a round trip, buy a one way there and a one way back to the US and then get a refund for the latter, or buy a one way there and a one way to someplace close like Ecuador and either go there on vacation or get a refund.

      As far as working, you don't need a separate visa. Once you get the PEB visa, you can work. What are you planning on doing there? Finding a job in your field might be hard.

      I swear, getting the visa is so much easier than getting married. Have you checked out www.expatperu.com or www.livinginperu.com ?

      Delete
  43. No, luckily his DNI is still the same, I'm looking at the DIGEMIN website now and it's already giving me a headache! I hope when I get there someone could at least help me with the process of all this. My husband usually has no idea whatsoever about all the technical stuff on visas with foreigners. Thanks for all your help and providing great info on this site!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not lucky if his DNI is the same. He has to change it to "married". He can't get you a visa if it says single.

      Delete
  44. Hi Sharon,

    thank you so much for this very great and informative site! I hope you can help me!

    I am planning on marrying a Canadian man who has Immigration Status on his CE here in Peru. Does this mean I can follow the steps of ‘marrying a Peruvian’ in order to get my residency-CE and eventually Citizenship? Or would he have to get Citizenship/naturalization before I can marry him as a Peruvian? Where can I find legal proof if Immigrant Status gives the same rights of marriage as a Peruvian on the web so I could show the immigration office ?

    If he needs to get Citizenship how can he do this? He got his CE/Immigration Status by marrying a Peruvian woman about 12 years ago. They got divorced 2-3 years ago. He has lived in Peru consistently for about 12-13 years. In applying for Citizenship, will they take into account his divorce or will this not matter considering how long he has been here?

    Also, in the process of marrying him, would we need to get his Birth Certificate legalized and translated? Or is it only me as a UK Citizen?

    Thanks for your help! Hara

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In order for you to get Peruvian citizenship, first your Canadian finace would need to get citizenship. All his immigrant status would give you would be a marriage visa. You don't need to show the immi office anything, they know the rules.

      As for getting married, you're both foreigners, so you both need the docs that foreigners need. IF and when he gets Peruvian cit, then you can as well. Translated and apostillised. he'll need his divorce cert too.

      For him to get cit, it doesn't matter that he's divorced, he simply has to follow the steps here, http://theultimateperulist.blogspot.com/2008/11/2i-naturalisation-immigrant-status.html It takes a while, maybe 6 months or so and since he's not married to a Peruvian he will have to take the tests. If he gets it and becomes Peruvian that you won't have to take the tests.

      Delete
  45. Hello dear, this is very helpful and informative site. i hope u can help me.
    I am a Bangladeshi citizen . i have a girl friend who live in Peru and she is Peruvian.we wanna marry. But i live in Bangladesh still now ,So how can i go to peru ,by tourist visa or other visa ? plz tell me .
    2. when i ll go in peru ,then she marry me ,so what should we do to get citizen of me ?
    3.If i get 90 days visa ,then if we marry ,so can i extension my visa ?
    4. How many time need to get visa after applying ?
    5. currently she works in chili ,so after marriage can i go to chili with her ?
    plz tell ..
    thank you

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 1. You'll need to get a tourist visa.
      2. You'll need to get Peruvian residency (which takes about 3 months), live in Peru for 2 years as a resident (never leaving for more than 6 months out of each calendar year), then apply to become a citizen (which takes about 6 months).
      3. Yes. You'll be able to get a PEB (married to a Peruvian) visa. Make sure you have all the documents you require.
      4. I don't understand your question. You just apply for the visa once.
      5. Yes. You'll be able to get a visa to accompany your spouse.

      Contact the nearest Peruvian and Chiliean embassies for more info.

      Delete
  46. hello!! your site is amazing, I sure hope you can help me! this may sound a little complicated. i am an American citizen and my boyfriend is a Peruvian citizen living in lima because he was deported from the U.S. we have two children together. one child has her birth certificate apostille sealed already but the baby doesn't. we are already in lima. first,does getting the birth certificate "legalized" mean the same as apostille sealed? and second, will i be able to do that here in lima, instead if having to travel back to the U.S? we also plan on getting married here in lima and i believe i will have to do the same with my birth certificate. and also for our kids to obtain dual citizenship since their father is a citizen of peru. thank you so much!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. (Blushes) Thank you very much! I'll try to help.
      1. No, legalised is different than apostillised. Legalised is the first step, apostillisation is the second.
      2. No, you will have to send it to the US to have to it done there. FYI: The Dept of State just changed the rules last fall. YOU have to personally request it. I've had my mom get docs before, but birth certs can only be gotten by the people whose names are on them. I used SignNow.com to notarise my signature. Here's a copy of the doc I used. If you email me at naturegirl321@yahoo.com I can send you a better copy.
      3. I didn't have to do it with my BC, but check since rules change often. And you might as well do it just to be safe :)

      YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS

      U.S. Department of State
      Authentications Office
      518 23rd Street, NW SA-1
      Columbia Plaza
      Washington, DC, USA 20520

      Date

      To Whom It May Concern:

      I, YOUR NAME, being duly sworn according to law, declare that:

      • I would like to request an apostillisation for my SON'S/DAUGHTER'S, THEIR NAME, original birth certificate because REASON.
      • The copy of my driver’s license is a true copy of the original

      COPY OF YOUR LICENSE

      Subscribed and sworn to me by:


      _________________________________
      YOUR NAME


      I, _________________________________ duly commissioned and qualified, do hereby certify that on DATE, YOUR NAME personally appeared before me and executed the foregoing instrument, and being first duly sworn, such person acknowledged that she executed said instrument for the purposes therein contained as her free and voluntary act and deed.


      _________________________________
      Signature of Notary

      _________________________________
      Date

      Hope this helps. Here are some more posts that might help you.
      http://www.tefl-tips.com/2013/06/apostillisations-and-fbi-background.html
      http://theultimateperulist.blogspot.com/2008/12/6b-official-translations-notarisation.html
      http://theultimateperulist.blogspot.com/2010/11/peru-and-hague-agreement.html

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  47. hi... very helpful blogs... im married to a peruvian but we arer residing in asia.. we are considering of moving to Peru soon... my inquiry is that, can somebody in my husband's family in Peru apply for his change status (DNI) or it should be him who will do it personally? your advice is much appreciated.. thanks. :-)

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    Replies
    1. Hi Leni, I'm also in Asia. He can actually change his DNI at the local Peruvian embassy. I just updated my info at the Peruvian embassy in Seoul. Very quick and easy.

      Delete
  48. Hello, I was wondering if you could please give me some advice, I have read all of the previous comments and you give great advice but unfortunately my situation is alittle different.

    I have been dating a Peruvian guy for 2 1/2 years now and we have been living together nearly 2 years (apart from 2 months when I went home to visit my family for Christmas) I have been living on a tourist visa, but now been told I need to apply for something else. I have been told to apply for a carnet de extranjeria, or a working visa but do we have to marry for this? and will it affect my own residency in the UK as we were planning to live here a few years and then go to the UK. I would like the best option that doesnt affect my passport etc as I know it wont be perminent here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sarah, I just realised that you didn't email me. Sorry about it. You basically have five options.

      1. Get a work visa. If you can score an expat package, all the better.
      2. Start your own business. It'll get you a visa. You'll need $25K and there's a lot of paperwork involved.
      3. Get a student visa. You will be able to work part-time as well. married.
      4. Get a retirement visa. You'll have to prove a steady source of income, not from a job. (ex, government retirement scheme, private retirement scheme, etc.)
      5. Get a family visa. If you have children that were born in Peru, they can become Peruvian citizens. If your kids are Peruvian, you might be able to get a visa through them. Get a lawyer. I've heard it's possible, but don't know anyone who has done it.

      Actually, there is one more option. You said that you've been living in Peru on a tourist visa for 2.5 years and have now been told that you can't do that anymore. I'm assuming that you've been border hopping this whole time and at the border you've been told that you can now longer do this, correct?

      If that's the case, and you're thinking about going back to the UK in a couple years, then you could simply overstay your visa. Don't border hop anymore. Don't leave Peru. When you do leave, it should be for good, when you move back to the UK.

      Now, of course, this is not without risk. You'll have to pay the $1 a day fine for overstaying, so if you stay 2 more years, that'll be $730. However, I have heard of people bargaining at the border. You might also be detained at the border and questioned. I don't know of anyone who has, but since you've been in Peru as a tourist for 2.5 years and will be spending a couple more years there as a tourist, it's a possiblity.

      Depending on where in Peru he lives, you might consider getting a job in Ecuador or Chile. Or going there as a tourist for a couple months and then going back to Peru.

      As for UK residency, honestly I have no idea. In the USA, there are two ways to "lose" residency. First is by being physically in a foreign country(ies) for 330 days of the year. The second is by being a bona fide resident in another country(ies), so having a job, house, car, family, etc in a foriegn country(ies).

      The little I know about UK residency is that you've already "lost" part of it so to speak. Since you've been out of the UK (as well as Europe I believe?) for more than 6 months, you are no longer entitled to NHIC. I've been told that in order to get that back you have to reside in the UK (or Europe?) for 6 months.

      Hope that helps, let me know if you have anymore questions.

      Delete
  49. Hi I live in the U.S. and I am a U.S. citizen but born in Peru. I have a boyfriend who lives in Peru and we want to get married. My question is it better for him to come to the U.S and we get married or is better for Me to go to Peru and marry him? Also how long is it until he get his paper after marriage? The original plan is for me to move to peru but depending on ex-husband and him letting me bring my kids to Peru. If he doesn't give me the permission My boyfriend will have to come to the states!. What paper should my boyfriend get in order to get a visa to come to the states? If he gets the marriage visa to come to the states how long after do have to get married if we get married in the states?
    Thank
    Erika

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That depends on where you live. I always tell people to get married in the country that they want to live in. If you're not sure, it would probably be easier to get married in Peru.

      I'm not sure what you mean by his "paper after marriage" you mean the new marriage cert or his visa? The new marriage cert should take a week or two. Getting the visa is often 6-9 months, but changes depending on how many people apply. You'd have to check with the American Embassy in Lima.

      If you're looking for what he needs to move to the US, please look at visajourney.com and immigrate2us.net I believe he has 90 days or 6 months to get legally married once he gets to the US, but I don't know for sure, I've never done that. For him to get a US visa there are a lot more steps than for you to get a Peruvian visa. Check out those two sites.

      On another note, if you were born in Peru, you should be able to get a Peruvian passport. Check with your nearest embassy or consulate.

      Delete

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