Saturday, November 15, 2008

2008 Peru Inspired Gift Guide

If you're looking for Peru inspired gifts, you've come to the right place! Here are a few ideas to get you started.


Food and Drinks
Paneton and hot chocolate is a staple during the Christmas season. Don't forget a Peruvian mug. While some might snub their nose at fruitcake (paneton), Peruvians love it. Drinking hot chocolate during summer might seem odd, but hey, it's Christmas, so why not?

If someone you know loves trying different alcoholic drinks from around the would, they should definitely try Pisco Sour. If they like taking shots, there are a number of Peruvian shot glasses to choose from. And despite what the Chileans may say, Pisco is Peruvian.

Peruvian grains are becoming famous around the world. A good healthy gift to give is quinoa. It's much better than rice and packed with nutrition.

For the cook in your life, Peruvian cookbooks are the way to go. They'll find great recipes like ceviche, lomo saltado, aji de gallina, papa rellena, and much more.

Clothing
Peru uses some great materials to make clothes, such as pima cotton and alpaca. Famous throughout the world, pima cotton is used to make many things such as sheets, clothing for kids and babies, as well as shirts for adults.

Alpaca is superior than wool since it is softer, warmer, and has no lanolin which means it's hypoallergenic. Traditional Peruvian hats, such as the chullo, will keep your loved ones warm through the cold winter months. Don't forget a warm shawl that they can wrap around themselves to protect them from windy days.

For the Home
Alpaca can be used for more than clothing. It also makes great blankets and throws. It's great for cozying up on the couch and drinking hot cocoa, from a Peruvian mug, of course.Another great material that comes from Peru is pima cotton. Famous throughout the world for many items, it is perhaps the most well-known for sheets.

Accessories
Tumi is a Peru inspired company that makes gorgeous bags and luggage. The quality can't be beat either. Whether you're looking to give someone a bag for business, travel, or casual, they've got you covered.

More Gifts
If you're looking for more ideas, here are other Peru inspired gift guides I've written.

The Ultimate Peru List recommends:

Thursday, November 13, 2008

Immigration Tips for Peru

Updated 11 January 2017

One tip to remember is that speaking Spanish will help you greatly. You'll be treated differently than if you speak English all the time, it'll help you assimilate to Peru, and it'll make talking to the immigration officers easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, check out Fluenz Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Synergy Spanish.

 ***Be sure you ask at Immigrations about your visa as rules and fees seem to change often.***

About Immigration

Migraciones is in charge of all the visas, resident permits and naturalisation done in Peru. Here's a list of offices in Lima. The main immigration office is located in Brena in Lima. However, there are other smaller immigration offices around Peru. Some of them are very small and can only do little things, such as help you get a replacement TAM. Others are bigger and will even allow you to get your CE there, outside of Lima. If you live outside of Lima, check with your closest immigration office and see what they can do.

The main office in Brena isn't one of the very nice districts in Lima. However, the area around Immigrations is safe. The worst thing that you'll have to deal with is people shouting "copies 20 cents". The address is Av. España 730. Maps can be found at Guia Calles. They open at 8am and close at 1pm. You now need an appointment in order to go to immigration. Make the "derecho de tramite" payment in order to schedule your appointment right away.Their phone number is 4176900. Here are some useful links.

Forms
They are available online at Migraciones or at the immigration offices. The forms are free. You'll have to pay the fee to file the form (or a fee to be exempt from the fee. . . yes, it's idiotics, I know. Go figure: nothing is free in Peru.) at the Banco de la Nacion.

Immigration Tips

  1. Don’t go to the Banco de la Nacion in Immigrations. There's usually a long line. Instead go to another one near your house. Also, don’t go to the Banco de la Nacion on days near the 15th or the 30th, these are pay days and the lines are super long.
  2. Make an appointment online. You'll have to use the Migraciones website. 
  3. Have everything ready. Make sure you have all the documents that you need and if necessary have them translated, notarised or legalised. Here's the general foreigner information and the information for immigrant visas and naturalisation.
  4. Make copies. Make sure you have photocopies of all your documents, front and back. They will stamp your copies and keep the orginals. You'll have to show either a passport or CE to get in.
  5. Go early. Go to Immigrations early in the morning when it first opens (8am) and there are less people in line.
  6. Bring something to do. A book to read, music to listen to, anything to keep you occupied as you might be there for a few hours.
  7. Be nice to the people who work there. Happy government workers are more likely to help you than unhappy or angry ones.
  8. Go to the Mesa de Partes first. When you're walking towards Immigrations, you'll see that the Peruvians go to the right, you go to the side door on the left. You'll have to show either a passport or CE to get in. If you have bags, they'll make you open them so they can check them. Simple things, like renewing your CE, take about 2 working days. More complicated things, like when you get your visa for the first time, can take a couple weeks to a couple months. When you come back, go to the third floor. All foreigners do their paperwork on the third floor.
  9. Get a tramidator. If you don’t want to go through all of this paperwork, get a tramitador to do the work for you. Numbers starting with 9 are mobiles and have 9 digits (including the starting with 9). Dial as is from inside Peru or use 0051 if you're calling from outside Peru. 7 digit numbers are Lima and would need 01 in front of them from inside Peru or 00511 if you're calling from outside Peru. Within Lima should work with 7 digits as shown. The following have been recommended by expats.
    • Adelfio Alcalde Auerzola 2249739 or 2262412
    • Jorge Huaranga 4718617
    • Marcelino Ibarra 3360572
    • Edgar Ramos 948901404
  10. Smile. Remember it’s not too bad; if you think that it’s difficult for you, look at the line to get Peruvian passports.




The Ultimate Peru List recommends:

Wednesday, November 12, 2008

Tourist Visa, Expired Visa, TAM, Onward Tickets for Peru

Updated 5 April 2017

***Be sure you ask at immigrations about your visa as rules and fees seem to change often. You now need an appointment in order to go to immigration. Make the "derecho de tramite" payment in order to schedule your appointment right away. ***

One tip to remember is that speaking Spanish will help you greatly. You'll be treated differently than if you speak English all the time, it'll help you assimilate to Peru, and it'll make talking to the immigration officers easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, check out Fluenz Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Synergy Spanish.

Information about Tourist Visas
Visa changes happened in July 2008. Now you can get up to 183 days on a tourist visa. But be sure to ask for all 183 days or else they might just give you 90.

Extending Tourist Visas
You can't extend a tourist visa anymore. You have to go visit another country for a bit and come back.

Onward Ticket
You will not be asked to show an onward ticket or sufficient funds in order to get into Peru. However, depending on the country you leave from or the airlines you fly on, you might be asked to buy an onward ticket if you don't have one.

As more and more airports are using self check-in kiosks, you will not be allowed to check-in if you have a one way ticket. You will be sent to talk directly someone. If you don't have residency in Peru, a Peruvian passport, or an onward ticket, chances are you will be made to buy one. The reason for this is that, if on the off chance Peru won't let you in because you don't have a way out of the country, then the airline is responsibly for getting you out of Peru, meaning that they have to fly you back for free.

It's always better to have a plane or bus ticket that you can show at the check-in counter just in case this happens. If you want to play it safe, then buy a refundable ticket out of Peru. Flying to Chile or Ecuador is pretty cheap, then just refund it when you arrive. If you are forced to buy a return ticket by the airlines, then simply refund it when you arrive in Peru.

Getting a Tourist Visa Before Arriving

To see if you need to apply for a tourist visa beforehand, check with the Peruvian embassy or consulate in your country. Here are some recent discussions about the new visa changes as well as border hopping. Border Hopping, 6 month visa, proof of border hopping for a couple of years.

If you need a visa in order to enter Peru, you may be asked to show an onward ticket. Any ticket, whether it be bus or air will do. You could also buy an MCO (Miscellaneous Charge Order) from the IATA (International Air Transport Association) which will allow you to fly on any IATA airline with seats available or give you a refund. See Customer Services for more details.

There's been some discussion about entering on a one-way ticket. In theory, you need a round trip if you enter on a tourist visa. Sometimes they require you to buy a return ticket at the airport, then you simply refund it. Or you might be asked to show proof of funds. Here are some recent discussions about onward tickets: Discussion 1, Discussion 2, Discussion 3

Expired Visa
You'll have to pay $1.25 (yes, that's US dollars that they use since the sol historically isn't stable) a day if you overstay your visa. The fee is payable at the airport or border crossing. Some people have bargained. You can find more info here.

Replacement TAM
You can find information in Spanish on the Migraciones site. It's called "duplicado de la Tarjeta de Migracion Andina". If you lose your TAM (Tarjeta de Migracion Andina), the little white paper that they give you when you enter Peru, you will have to get a new one before you leave. The process is relatively easy. You can go to the nearest immigration office with the following three items. Here's a list of offices in Lima. The main immigration office is located in Brena in Lima. However, there are other smaller immigration offices around Peru.The whole process should only take between one and three days depending on what city you do it from. Here's what you'll need.
  • Form F002.
  • Pay the fee at the Banco de la Nacion
  • Your original passport and copy of the Peruvian stamp / visa.




The Ultimate Peru List recommends:

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Visa/Permission to Sign Contracts in Peru

Updated 1 July 2012 

One tip to remember is that speaking Spanish will help you greatly. You'll be treated differently than if you speak English all the time, it'll help you assimilate to Peru, and it'll make talking to the immigration officers easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, check out Fluenz Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Synergy Spanish.

***Be sure you ask at immigrations about your visa as rules and fees seem to change often.***

This visa is ONLY for those on a tourist or student visa.
A permission to sign a contract visa is useful if you want to sign contracts, whether they be for work or to purchase things, such as vehicles or property. This visa is not a work visa! It just lets you legally sign contracts. You can find information at Migraciones. It's called "permiso para firmar contratos". Here's what you'll need.
  • Form F007.
  • Pay the fee for the form and do change your visa status at the Banco de la Nacion
  • Your passport
  • Your TAM / Andean Card (embarkment card). If lost it, you will have to replace it.
Make copies of everything so that they can stamp your copies. Leave the originals at the Mesa de Partes at Immigrations and come back when they tell you to. It usually takes a couple days. Here's a person's story on how easy it is to get the permission to sign a contract visa.





The Ultimate Peru List recommends:

Monday, November 10, 2008

Work Visas for Peru

Updated 5 September 2013

 ***Be sure you ask at immigrations about your visa as rules and fees seem to change often. You now need an appointment in order to go to immigration. Make the "derecho de tramite" payment in order to schedule your appointment right away.***

One tip to remember is that speaking Spanish will help you greatly. You'll be treated differently than if you speak English all the time, it'll help you assimilate to Peru, and it'll make talking to the immigration officers easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, check out Fluenz Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Synergy Spanish.

In order to get this visa your employer will have to request a work visa for you. You can find information at Migraciones. It's called "visa de trabajador". Some places are not willing to do this simply because of the high cost and time involved. It usually takes around three months and can cost up to $500. They are good for one year and you will get both a work visa in your passport and a carne de extranjeria. (foreign resident card / CE). For letters and documents to immigrations, go to Letters for Immigrations.
  • Form F007.
  • Pay the fee at the Banco de la Nacion
  • Legalised copy of your passport. NB: 30 September 2010, Peru joined the Hague Agreement. Legalisation rules have changed. Please see Peru and the Hague Agreement for more info.
  • After your contract has been approved by the Ministerio del Trabajo. Get your contract notarised by a notary or legalised by Migraciones. In order to get your contract approved by the Ministero del Trabajo, you may need your university degree apostillised, see Peru and the Hague Agreement for more info.
  1. Make copies of everything so that they can stamp your copies. Leave the originals at the Mesa de Partes at Immigrations come back when they tell you to.
  2. While you're waiting, go to INTERPOL. Steps can be found here.
  3. In theory, you no longer have to leave the country to pick up a residence visa. All the paperwork can now be done in Lima. However, some people have been asked to leave to get their visas. I'm not sure why. (Peru seems to change rules all the time). I think it's on a case by case basis.
  4. Pick up your visa, bring copies of your passport and 2 passport photos. Call ahead and ask how much the visa will be. They might want you to go to a bank first and deposit the fee for the visa. You'll also need a carne sized photo when you pick up the visa.
  5. Then, follow the steps to get your carne de extranjeria.




The Ultimate Peru List recommends:

Sunday, November 9, 2008

Family and Marriage Visas for Peru

Updated 10 August 2016

***Be sure you ask at immigrations about your visa as rules and fees seem to change often. You now need an appointment in order to go to immigration. Make the "derecho de tramite" payment in order to schedule your appointment right away.***

One tip to remember is that speaking Spanish will help you greatly. You'll be treated differently than if you speak English all the time, it'll help you assimilate to Peru, and it'll make talking to the immigration officers easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, check out Fluenz Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Synergy Spanish.

According to Peruvian law, you CAN earn money while on this visa. So there's no problem if you want to get a job. You can find information at Migraciones. It's called "llamado de familia".

You can get this visa if you are . . .

  • An underaged child of a Peruvian citizen (if the child isn't Peruvian) or immigrant
  • Married to a Peruvian or immigrant
You might also be able to get the visa if you are . . . 
  • A parent of a Peruvian child (whether they are a minor or of age) or immigrant
  • A parent of a Peruvian child and the child has special needs
  • A sibling of a Peruvian citizen or immigrant
  • In-laws of a Peruvian citizen or immigrant
  • An adult child of a Peruvian citizen or immigrant
Since this is a family visa, someone in your family can sponsor you. Who they consider family might vary from immigration officer to immigration officer and you might need to get a lawyer to help you with complicated cases.

Family might be your children, your siblings, your parents, or your in-laws. The issue is that they should be able to support you. Since children born in Peru can get citizenship via jus soli (meaning that anyone born on Peruvian soil can become Peruvians, children might be able to sponsor their parents. However, this doesn't mean that your infant can sponsor you. In most cases, the person must be financially stable (an example of an exception would be a child with special needs). If your child is a minor who earns money, for example, an actor than that would be a different story. Likewise if your child was of age and had a job. When in doubt, contact a lawyer or migraciones.

Getting Married in Peru
If you're not married yet, but are planning on getting married in Peru, you can find the steps here in the Marriage Section. The information below is for those who are married. For all other cases, you will have to do the same things, except instead of a marriage license, you'll have to show birth certificates to prove they you are related. Check with immigrations for a complete list of what you need. Either call them or go in person. Make sure to documents apostillised and translated if necessary.

Check here for personal stories about getting marriage visas. For those of you married to a Peruvian, you can get a resident visa that allows you to work in Peru. If you're not married yet, but are planning on getting married in Peru, you can find the steps here in the Marriage Section. It takes about two months to get.

You no longer have to leave the country to pick up a residence visa. All the paperwork can now be done in Lima. You will also get a carne de extranjeria (foreign resident card / CE) which is proof of residency. You have to renew it yearly and pay the yearly foreigner's tax. After three years of residency, you can become a Peruvian citizen. There are two ways to get the visa, depending on where you got married.

Name Change
If you change your name and get a new passport, you MUST transfer your visa from your old passport to your new passport.

For bank accounts, you just go to the bank with your bank card and DNI. Same goes for your pension plan. For property you'll have to go to SUNARP and bring a letter explaining the change as well as notarised copies of your documents.

You have to show your old name and new name. You could bring your old and new CE, or your old CE and your new DNI and Naturalisation paper. You'll also have to fill out a form. You'll also need your original partida de matrimonio (marriage license) and a notarised copy of your spouse's DNI.

Depending on Where You Got Married
If you got married outside of Peru, you've got a couple of steps to take. You will have to register it in the country where you got married (probably at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs) and then go to the Peruvian consulate / embassy and register it with them. They will then give you a Peruvian marriage certificate. Do this quickly as possible because there may be a time limit. If possible, get a couple marriage certificates. You will need a new marriage certificate every year in order to renew residency.

Ask them if your marriage will be registered with RENIEC. If it will not be registered with RENIEC, then you will also have to do that when you get here. When you come to Peru, you have between 30 and 90 days to register your marriage depening on the person you talk to. It will have to be apostillised; see Peru and the Hague Agreement for more info. It will also have to be translated by a certified translator, if not in Spanish (see Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores (RREE) and do a search for traductores oficiales). Then go to RENIEC and register your marriage if it hasn't already been registered. Then you have to do everything above that people who got married in Peru have to do. For letters, go to Letters for Immigrations.

OR

1. If you got married in Peru, you need either your Partida de Matrimonio or your Acta de Matrimonio, which must be legalized by RENIEC. In order to legalise your document, first you need to go to the Banco de la Nacion and pay 17 soles.

Then You Must Have
These documents can be gotten from Migraciones or printed off their website.
  • Form F007. 
  • Form F004 (to change the status of your visa. If you have a tourist visa, mark the first box. If you have a different visa, you'll have to fill out the blanks at the top.
  • Pay the fees for the forms (the code for the F004 is 01814) and the annual foreigner’s tax at the Banco de la Nacion. 
  • Copy of your passport
  • Copy of your visa or entry stamp into Peru
  • Original TAM (Tarjeta Andina de Migraciones). This is the little white paper you get when you enter Peru.
  • Original passport
Your Spouse Needs to Give You
  • They will have to sign a document in the presence of a public notary saying that they will financially support you while you are in Peru. (see Letters for Immigrations.)
  • Photocopy of their DNI with casado/a status. They MUST change their civil status so that it says that they are married.
At Immigrations
  1. Make copies of everything so that they can stamp your copies. Leave the originals at the Mesa de Partes at Immigrations come back when they tell you to. They will probably tell you to call or email them in 15 days to check the status of your CE.
  2. While you're waiting, go to INTERPOL Steps can be found here.
  3. In theory, you no longer have to leave the country to pick up a residence visa. All the paperwork can now be done in Lima.
  4. Pick up your visa, bring copies of your passport and 2 passport photos. Call ahead and ask how much the visa will be. You'll also need a carne sized photo when you pick up the visa.
  5. Then, follow the steps to get your carne de extranjeria.




The Ultimate Peru List recommends:

Saturday, November 8, 2008

CE (Foreign Resident Card) in Peru

Updated 11 January 2017

 ***Be sure you ask at immigrations about your visa as rules and fees seem to change often. You now need an appointment in order to go to immigration. Make the "derecho de tramite" payment in order to schedule your appointment right away.***

***While on a retirement or student visa, legally you are NOT allowed to earn money in Peru. You CAN earn money while on a marriage / spousal / family visa.***

One tip to remember is that speaking Spanish will help you greatly. You'll be treated differently than if you speak English all the time, it'll help you assimilate to Peru, and it'll make talking to the immigration officers easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, check out Fluenz Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Synergy Spanish.

The Foreign Resident Card is referred to in many ways: CE, carne de extranjeria, carnet de extranjeria, carne, carnet, and resident card. All of these mean the same thing, it's a ID card that proves that you have resident and allows foreigners to live legally in Peru.

It's not necessary for you to submit the paperwork, renew your CE, or pay the foreigner's tax yourself. You can go to a notary and ask for a "carta poder". This is a Power of Attorney that you give to someone to act on your behalf. The only thing that you will have to do personally is go to Immigrations when they need to fingerprint you and take your photo and INTERPOL for fingerprinting, dental exam, and photos.

I know that most people get their CEs in Lima. Here's a list of offices in Lima. The main immigration office is located in Brena in Lima. However, there are other smaller immigration offices around Peru that might also allow you to get your CE there, ex. Cusco. The best thing to do is and ask.

Residency consists of two parts. First, you get the resident visa in your passport. Then, you get your CE. You don't have to renew the visa; you have to renew the CE and pay the yearly foreigner's tax.

You can find the following information below:
1. INTERPOL
2. Getting Your CE
3. Permission to travel while your paperwork is in process
4. Paying the Foreigner's Tax
5. Renewing your CE
6. Getting a Duplicate CE
7. Updating Your Data
8. Expired CE
9. Losing Residency
10. Cancelling Residency


1. INTERPOL
You should probably go to INTERPOL right after you apply for your resident visa. Don't wait until all the paperwork has been processed for your resident visa. I would suggest that while you are waiting for your visa, go and start the process because it can take a couple of days for them to get the results. Interpol has moved (thanks to quirquinchu for this info), they are no longer at Velasco Astete and Caminos del Inca. They are now located in the (police station) Comisaría Monterrico, Cuadra 6 de Manuel Olguin, behind the Hipódromo, between Javier Prado and Av. Derby. It's probably best to take a taxi there. You need to walk through to the back courtyard for the Interpol section. As usual, early birds served first, though "Provincias" (outside Lima) or "Adulto Mayor" could advance you a bit. Provincias assumes you caught a long distance bus and really can't afford a night in Lima, Adulto Mayor (over 65) have legal privileges. The staff there are pretty friendly.. You need to bring:
  • Receipt from the Banco de la Nacion for the fee
  • Your passport
  • Receipts from immigrations
  • An envelope (just in case they run out, as they often do)
  • Paperwork you have from the immigration office
  • Photocopies of everything else
  • Make sure you know your height in meters and weight in kilos.
They now take photos at INTERPOL, so there's no need to bring any. You'll have to pay for the photos. Don't lose the receipt you will receive from the INTERPOL office. They will fingerprint you and look at your teeth, then put the information in the envelope you bring, and you will go mail it to the address they give you.

2. Getting your CE 
In order to get your CE you first have to have a resident visa. Work and Family / Marriage visas are the most common. Student and Retirement visas are also possible. There are other possibilities as well, check Migraciones for a complete list.

Once you have your resident visa, you will need to get your carne de extranjeria, which you have 30 days to get it after you get your resident visa. Immigration SHOULD let you know (either by phone or email) that your paperwork is ready.

Their new system is that you email them after 15 days with your ticket number and other information. Then they respond and tell you when to come in. However, if you don't hear from them in a couple of weeks, call them.

While you are waiting for your visa, go to INTERPOL and start the process. That way when you get your visa, you will already have the INTERPOL documents that you need and you can go straight to immigrations.

Once you get your CE, you can't be out of the country for more than 6 months in a year or you'll lose residency. If you want to keep residency, you'll have to come to Peru every six months. There is a way around this, and that's if you let immigrations know beforehand. See the "losing residency" section below for specific information and links.
  1. Go to the Banco de la Nacion and pay for the F004, which is for you to change your status to residency and F007A, which is for you to be put in the foreigner's registry.
  2. Make copies of everything. Take the receipts, the forms, carta de garantia from your spouse or work (go to Letters for Immigration), your Tarjeta Andina (some people have had to turn in their Tarjeta Andina when they got their resident visa, if that's the case, just bring a photocopy. If you don't have a photocopy, then just tell immigrations that you already handed your Tarjeta Andina over to them), your receipts / money order from INTERPOL, and your passport. Leave the originals at the Mesa de Partes at Immigrations. They'll stamp your copies. Come back when they tell you to.
  3. Get fingerprinted and photographed at Immigrations and then you’ll get your carne.
  4. Now that you have your CE, don't forget that every year you have to pay the foreigner's tax (between Jan and Mar) and renew it every year. See below for more info. If you get an immigrant visa, then you no longer have to renew it, but you still have to pay the foreigner's tax.

3. Travelling while your CE is in process
If you've started the CE process but have to leave Peru before you actually get your CE, you need to get special permission to do so. This is for those that need to leave for business or family reasons. They'll be gone a short time, but plan on coming back to Peru.

This is for those who don't have IRCE (Inscripcion Registro Central de Extranjeria / Registered in the Foreigners' Registry) or CCM (Cambio de Clase Migratorio / Change of Migratory Status). If you plan on leaving Peru forever, then go to immigrations and ask what you need to do.

You need the following. It might be processed right then and there, but could also take up to 2 take up to two days to process.
  • Form F-007
  • Pay the fee at the Banco de la Nacion
  • The original ticket that shows that you're going to be leaving Peru
  • A copy of the ticket that shows that you're going to be leaving Peru

4. Paying the Foreigner's Tax or Getting the Exoneracion
You can do this in any immigration office in the country (offices in Lima and smaller immigration offices). Don’t forget that you have to pay the foreigner’s tax between January and March. If you pay late you’ll have to pay a late fee. If you are in the provinces and want to pay your TAE (tasa anual de extranjeria / annual foreigner's tax), you can do it at any Banco de la Nacion. Be sure to tell them the code: 2690. When you're in Lima just pick up your voucher. They've stopped giving stickers. If you need to pay the tax, go to the Banco de la Nacion. Save your receipt. You'll need 3 things
  • Proof you've paid the tax $20 from the Banco de la Nacion
  • Your CE
  • 1 copy of your CE
At immigrations they will give you a ticket with a number on it. You need to go to the 3rd floor. It's usually hectic and the people working there seem to never be happy. Only one person deals with the tax. You'll need one copy of your CE. They've stopped giving you stickers and will just give you a voucher that says you've paid.  If you're married to a Peruvian, you can get the exoneracion and pay a bit less, but it's easier and faster to just pay the tax.

OR

If you are married to a Peruvian (or fall into the no tax category, such as those here on religious visas, you don't have to pay the tax. You can get exonerated from the tax, however, you have to pay a fee in order not to pay the tax. Honestly this takes more time, effort, money and patience and is not really worth it, but here's the info anyways). You can find information at Migraciones. It's called "exoneracion del pago de la tasa anual de extranjeria". You need the following.
  • Form F007 
  • To pay the fee at the Banco de la Nacion to process F007.
  • Your legalised partida de matrimonio issued in the current year
  • A notarised letter from your spouse. For letters and documents for immigrations, go to Letters for Immigration.
  1. Make a copy of F007 with the ticket of your payment attached. Leave the documents at the Mesa de Partes (ground floor) at Migraciones. Keep the copy you made. Come back in two days.
  2. Return to immigrations and go to the 3rd floor. Go to the counter and give them the copy of F007. Wait a bit and then you will get a voucher saying you've paid the tax.

5. Renewing Your Carne de Extranjeria
(The information below is for those married to a Peruvian. If you're not married to a Peruvian, you still have to go through a similar process. Except instead of your marriage cert, a letter from your spouse, and your spouse's DNI you will need your work contract, a letter from your boss, and your boss's DNI.) You can find information at Migraciones. It's called "Prorroga de residencia". You need the following.
  • Formulario F007.
  • Pay the fee at the Banco de Nacion for Form F007.
  • Legalised letter from your spouse that requests the prorroga. For letters and documents for immigrations, go to Letters for Immigration.
  • Wedding certificate legalised by RENIEC (If you got married out of Peru, it has to be apostillised first; see Peru and the Hague Agreement for more info. Then legally translated by an official translator and legalised by the Foreign Affairs Ministry (RREE) for more information.
  • Copy of your spouse's DNI (They may ask for the original so you might want to bring it as well.)
  • Your original CE
  • Your original passport
  1. Make a copy of all the documents.
  2. Go the window number 3 or 4 on the 3rd floor and handed in the documents. If that doesn't work, leave the documents at the Mesa de Partes (ground floor) at immigrations.Then come back two days later. When you return to Migraciones go to the 3rd floor. Go to the Prorroga de Residencia counters (window 3 or 4) and give them the copy of F007 and then you will get your carne with its new sticker.

6. Getting a Duplicate CE
If you've lost or had your CE stolen, you will need to get a new one. You can find information at Migraciones. It's called "duplicado de carne de extranjeria".
  • Formulario F007.
  • Pay the fee for a replacement CE  at the Banco de la Nacion.
  • Re-pay the foreigner's tax.
  1. Go to the police station and tell them why you don't have your CE. File a police report.
  2. Get a copy of the police report by going to the BCP (Banco de Credito del Peru) and paying the fee.
  3. Go to Migraciones with the BCP receipts, police report and formulario and hand over your documents at the Mesa de Partes.
  4. Wait two days and pick up your new CE.

7. Updating Your Data
If you've changed your name, civil status or address, you're supposed to update your data. You will have to pay for two things: changing your data and getting a new card. You MUST do both of these steps at once. You can find information at Migraciones. It's called "modificacion de datos en la ficha de inscripcion del registro central de extranjeria". You'll need the following in order to change the data. Anything not in Spanish or any document from abroad MUST be apostillised and translated.
  • Formulario F007.
  • Pay the fee at the Banco de la Nacion.
  • Present at least one, or a combination of the following: original marriage cert, original death cert of your spouse, original divorce papers, legalised change of nationality papers, original passport with old name, original passport with new name, sworn statement saying that you have changed your address.

In order to get a new CE with the new data, you need to get the following and make copies of everything.
  • Formulario F007.
  • Pay the fee for a replacement CE at the Banco de la Nacion.
  • Re-pay the foreigner's tax.
  1. Make copies of everything.
  2. Present documents at the Mesa de Parte at immigrations.
  3. Come back when they tell you to, usually in 2 working days.

8. Expired CE
You are supposed to renew your CE every year. If you don't renew on time, you will have to pay a fine. Though if you are only a couple of days late, they might waive the fine. However, if you renew too late, or were out of the country, you may lose your residency. See "losing residency" below for more information.

9. Losing Residency
There are two possible ways to lose residency.
  1. Not renewing on time.
  2. Being outside of Peru for too long.
I'm not sure exactly how long you can have an expired CE before losing residency. I'm guessing that it's six months. Actually, I'm not sure if not renewing your CE can cause you to lose residency. However, it's not worth the risk. Peru often changes immigration laws. The best thing is prevention. Don't let your CE expire.

It's been said that if you're outside of Peru for six months or more in a row, then you lose residency. When you enter Peru after being away for more than 6 months, they will stamp your passport as a tourist. Supposedly, if you know that you will be gone for more than six months, you CAN keep your residency, but only if you let immigrations know and file the necessary paperwork. Look at cusco's post in this thread.

If you want to keep residency, you'll have to come to Peru every six months. If you spend more than 6 months outside of Peru and want to keep your residency, you will have to get permission from immigration. Here is what you will have to do if you want to leave for more than 183 days. You can read more info about this in Chris' blog. More first hand experience can be read in this thread.

10. Cancelling Residency
If you're going to be leaving Peru, you should cancel your CE. After cancelling your CE, you need to leave Peru within 10 days. (Steps can be found here to cancel your CE.) Some people say that there's no need to cancel it if you're leaving. Others say that you should cancel it because if you leave and come back after six months you'll have to cancel the first one, then wait 72 hours before you can apply for a new one.






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Friday, November 7, 2008

Residents: Leaving Peru and Tax Forms

Updated 1 July 2012 

Please also see Paying Income Tax. If you're leaving Peru forever and want to give up your residency, see Resident Card. If you're a resident with a CE, then you will have to present tax forms at the border. There are two types of taxes forms: those for those who have earned money and those for those who have not earned money. More info can be found at SUNAT.

One tip to remember is that speaking Spanish will help you greatly. You'll be treated differently than if you speak English all the time, it'll help you assimilate to Peru, and it'll make talking to the government workers easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, check out Fluenz Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Synergy Spanish.

If you've earned money
  • Have your employer fill out this form if you have earned money in Peru: Form 1492 or available online as Form 1692. OR
  • Have your employer fill out Form 1073 (Peruvian Income Tax receipt). This needs to be completed, signed, stamped "paid" with the receipt for your taxes paid attached and Form 1494. This form will be provide by (Human Resources & Administration).

If you haven't earned money
  • Fill out this if you have not earned money in Peru: Form 1495. This includes children with CEs.





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Thursday, November 6, 2008

Permission for Children to Travel with Only One Parent

Updated 8 January 2016

Children travelling alone, with someone else, or with just one parent may need a notarised letter of consent from the other parent if they share legal custody. You can also read more about custody at HCCH.

If you're an American and trying to figure out how to get a passport without the other parent's permission, read the post about custody vs. parental rights and international child abduction.

Some people have taken their kids and never been asked for a permission letter, others have been grilled with questions. I personally would just get one to be on the safe side.

Speaking Spanish will help you greatly. You'll be treated differently than if you speak English all the time, it'll help you assimilate to Peru, and it'll make talking to the government workers easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, check out Fluenz Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Synergy Spanish.

If Both Parents Have Custody
This rule is for when the couple is married or if the other parent has officially recognised the child as being his/hers. This means that BOTH parents are on the birth certificate.
  1. A recent apostillised birth certificate for your child. If it's not in Spanish, it will have to be officially translated into Spanish.
  2. A notarised letter. See Letters to immigration for the format. (If the child travels outside of Peru alone, both parents will have to sign the letter. If the child is travelling with one parent, then the other will have to sign the letter.) Here's an example of a permission to travel letter.

If Only One Parent Has Custody
  1. When only one parent is on the birth certificate: You will need a notarised and apostillised copy of the birth certificate. I would also bring the original birth certificate.
  2. When both parents are on the birth certificate: You will need proof that you have sole custody. Here's an example for a parent with sole custody. 
  3. When the other parent has passed away: For a widow(er), there are exceptions, you either present your ID showing that you are a widow(er) or bring a death certificate. The death certificate should probably be apostillised and translated as well.

Example Consent Letters
  • Canada has one
  • Look at the one below

Consent Letter
I, (person not travelling), am the lawful (mother / father / guardian) of (child's name). I declare the following:

Minor child's details:
(Child's name) was born on (DOB) in (place). She holds a (name of country) passport with number ______________ valid from __________ to _____________ and issued by ________________.

The aforementioned child has my consent to travel with:
(His / her) (mother / father / teacher / etc) (Person's name), was born on (DOB) in (place). She holds a (name of country) passport with number ______________ valid from __________ to _____________ and issued by ________________.

The aforementioned child has my consent to travel on the following flights:
Place, date, flight info for each flight.

Any questions regarding this consent letter can be directed to:
Name of person giving consent
Address
Cell
Email
Person giving consent
Signature
Name
Date



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Wednesday, November 5, 2008

How to Get Peruvian Citizenship

Updated 10 August 2016

 ***Be sure you ask at immigrations about your visa as rules and fees seem to change often. You now need an appointment in order to go to immigration. Make the "derecho de tramite" payment in order to schedule your appointment right away.***

Remember that speaking Spanish will help you greatly. You'll be treated differently than if you speak English all the time, it'll help you assimilate to Peru, and it'll make talking to the government workers easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, check out Fluenz Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Synergy Spanish.

If you're looking for information about renouncing (giving up) Peruvian citizenship, you can find that information here.

Immigrant Visa
If you've been in Peru for three years, but do not want to get citizenship, you can get an immigrant visa (inmigrante). This is long-term residency visa, so you don't have to renew your residency every year. However, you still have to pay the foreigner's tax. I'm not sure if you can get an inmigrante visa if you have a retirement visa; ask at immigrations.


General Requirements for Naturalisation
Please see the sections below about the 3 different ways to get citizenship.

  • Have 2 continuous years with a CE (Waived if at least one of your parents are Peruvian)
  • Have paid the foreigner tax (or exoneration if you're married to a Peruvian)
  • Have a valid CE
  • Pass exams: Spanish, Peruvian history and culture
  • Verification of no criminal activity and residence (and marriage if applicable)
  • Provide all the necessary documentation
  • Pass an interview
  • Give back your CE
Plan on it taking about six months to a year to get citizenship. This includes getting the documents, taking the exams, having someone verify your place of residence (and marriage, if applicable), receiving citizenship, getting your DNI, and passport.

Time and CE: The required time for naturalisation is three years after getting your CE. You will have to give back your CE once you get your naturalisation document and you may have to change your name. If you haven't paid the foreigner tax or the exoneration, do so. Your CE will have to be up-to-date. For those with Peruvian parents, there is no time requirement, however you must first have a CE. Here's the general foreigner information and the information for immigrant visas and naturalisation.

Exams: When I got citizenship, it wasn't necessary to take the exams or have anyone verify your marriage. Peru's tightening up its requirements. You will also have to pass tests in Spanish as well as Peruvian history and culture, even if you're married to a Peruvian. I've been told that it's pretty difficult and it's been getting harder. You need 12 out of 20 points to pass.

Some things you should know are the national anthem, the rivers, the president of Peru, the president of Congress, the prime minister, Inca rulers, Peruvian authors, etc. Here's some info about questions on the exams and notes about what to study. The good news is that it just requires rote memorisation, not thinking. They usually mark the exams on the same day, but they say the standard wait for them to notify you is 15 days.

Provide all the Necessary Documentation: Yea for forms! Make sure you get everything you need.

Verification of No Criminal Activity and Residence (and Marriage): You'll have to swear that you have not committed any crimes as well as get docs from INTERPOL. You'll also have to swear that you reside at your residence. You may have a government official visit your home.

Interview: They'll interview you about becoming a Peruvian citizen. You will have to speak Spanish.

Give Back Your CE: When you become Peruvian you will have to give back your CE. You'll then get a DNI.


Dual Nationality
Dual (multi) citizenship isn't recognised by all countries. It is, however, recognised by Peru. The US government and the Australian government have lists of which countries allow dual citizenship. According to the US, Peru doesn't allow dual citizenship, however, there are lots of loopholes. As you can see on the Australian link. It says that dual citizenship is allowed in some form in Peru. Dual citizenship IS allowed. Peru does, begrudgingly, recognise it, so there's no need to worry. I'm an American and got Peruvian citizenship due to marriage. I'm now a dual citizen.

In order for you to get dual citizenship your country of origin will also have to recognise dual citizenship. You will have to check with your home country though. For example, if you're German and want to get Peruvian citizenship, you have to give up your German citizenship. Exceptions to this are children born to parents with different citizenships. Check with your home country's embassy for more information.

Other places, like the US, do acknowledge and allow dual citizenship (yes, the US does and has allowed dual citizenship for about 50 years. They simply don't encourage it and you ALWAYS must enter and exit the US on your US passport.) I went to the US Embassy and signed a document that I made saying that I didn't want to give up US citizenship. They told me that it really wasn't necessary because it's very difficult and there's lots of paperwork to give up US citizenship (except for extreme cases, like terrorism). For more info about US law check RickW and the State Department's Website.

Possible (Required) Name Change
Be aware that you will most likely have your name changed if you get citizenship. If you only have one last name, you will be forced to take two (your father's last name and your mother's).  

NB: Some people have been forced to change their names, others haven't. It seems that MEN are not asked to add their mother's last name, but WOMEN are. In fact, some men have asked to add their mother's last name and have been refused.

I was forced to add my mother's last name and told I had to add a second last name in order to become Peruvian. I spent a couple hours talking with the workers and administration, they refused to change their minds. Yet men don't have to change their names. Go figure, this is one of the many reasons why I left Peru. You can see more on this discussion at Expat Peru.

This means that you will have to change your bank account, pension, and any property, such as a house, apartment or car to your new name. If you are married, you can also add the "de" and your husband's last name, though this is optional. (You would have three last names: your father's, mother's, "de" and your husband's.) This is done at RENIEC, when you get your naturalisation cert, it will just have two last names (your father's last name and your mother's).

For the bank accounts, you just go to the bank with your bank card and DNI. Same goes for your pension plan. For the propery you'll have to go to SUNARP and bring a letter explaining the change as well as notarised copies of your DNI, CE, Naturalisation paper. You'll also have to fill out a form. If you're married you'll need your original partida de matrimonio (marriage license) and a notarised copy of your spouse's DNI.

Changing your Documents after Naturalisation
You will have to change important documents, such as your bank accounts, property title, car title, driving license, pension plan, last will and testimony, etc. In order to do this you usually need two documents: a notarised copy of your CE and your original DNI. The last step of naturalisation is handing over your CE. BEFORE you do this, be sure to make a couple notarised copies.

Three Different Ways to get Peruvian Citizenship
  1. Naturalisation for those NOT married to a Peruvian
  2. Naturalisation for those married to a Peruvian
  3. Naturalisation for those with Peruvian parent(s)

1. Naturalisation for those NOT married to a Peruvian
You will have to pass tests in Spanish as well as Peruvian history and culture. Then you will have to get the President's signature (which can take from 3-6 months) as well as fulfill the general requirements. Expat Peru has a guide about how to do this. Here's the general foreigner information and the information for immigrant visas and naturalisation.

2. Naturalisation due to marriage
For those married to Peruvians, it's a bit easier. But you'll still have to jump through a lot of hoops. Here's the general foreigner information and the information for immigrant visas and naturalisation.
  • 4 passport size photos.
  • Your original and a notarised copy of your carne de extranjeria that shows three years residency (with foreigner's tax paid, and residency up to date)
  • An original copy of your spouse's birth certificate. (They're only valid for 30 days)
  • A simple copy of your spouse's DNI showing casada status.
  • A letter (solicitud) to the Director of Immigration asking for your application to be considered. You can find one at Migraciones in the immigrant visas and naturalisation section or in letters to immigration.
  • A statutory declaration that you are healthy and have no criminal convictions. You can find one at Migraciones in the immigrant visas and naturalisation section or in letters to immigration.
  • Form F006.
  • Pay the fee for Form F006 and the registration fee at the Banco de la Nacion.
  • A recent copy (no older than 30 days) of your original Peruvian marriage certificate showing 2 years of marriage. If you got married abroad, you'll have to have registered (see getting your CE for how to register your marriage)your marriage previously with RENIEC and show your Peruvian marriage certificate.)
  • A ficha de canje international from INTERPOL. 
  • A sworn statement stating your address and that you haven't committed any crimes. There's a sample in letters to immigration.
  • You will also have to pass tests in Spanish as well as Peruvian history and culture.
  • Personal interview.
NOTE: I would imagine that there are exceptions to the 2 years of marriage. For example, if you had another CE for a year, then got married and were on a marriage visa for a year, then you would have three years of residence in Peru, but only one year of marriage. If you have had a valid CE for three years, but have been married for less, check with immigrations.

Steps for Naturalisation due to Marriage
You can also see the section at Migraciones about immigrant visas and naturalisation.
  1. Make copies of everything so that they can stamp your copies. Leave the orginals at the Mesa de Partes at Immigrations. Don't leave the registration fee. They will tell you when to come back, it's usually three to five days. Bring the registration fee with you when you come back.
  2. Then you will have to go to the naturalisation office on the 3rd floor, they will check your documents. It opens at 8:00 am and closes at 1pm. You will give them your registration fee.
  3. You will then have to come back again, usually between 5 and 15 days. They will then make you sign papers and fingerprint you. You should also get either certified copies or notarised copies of your carne (CE). You'll need it to change your data on things such as your car, house, bank accounts, etc.
  4. To get notarised ones, simply go to a notary. For certified copies of your carne, you need to fill out form F002, pay the fee at the Banco de la Nacion and make 5 copies. You leave these at the Mesa de Partes and can pick them up in two days. (This MUST be done before you pick up your naturalisation document. In order to get your naturalisation document you have to give them back your CE. And in order to pick up the certified copies of your CE, you need your CE.)
  5. You will set up an appointment so that a police officer will visit you at home in order to make sure you live where you say.
  6. You will set up another appointment so that you and your spouse will have to be interviewed by the director.
  7. You'll have to wait a couple weeks.
  8. You'll have to pay a fee of 35 soles. They will give you your naturalisation document (titulo de registro) and tell you how to get certified copies of your naturalisation document, which you need to get your DNI. The register has two parts: one part stays in the register and the other part is given to you as your titulo of citizenship. When you sign the register you will have to give them your CE (so make sure you get notarised or certified copies of it BEFORE you sign the register.)
The steps to get your DNI can be found at RENIEC. One thing to remember, at RENIEC they will probably tell you that you need two witnesses in order for you to get your DNI (because you're over 18). This is WRONG. Because you were naturalised and not born Peruvian, you do NOT need witnesses. Show them your titulo and there will be two signatures there. Those take the place of the witnesses. If they still give you trouble, ask to talk to a supervisor and make a scene.

3. Naturalisation for adult (18+) children of Peruvians
For those with Peruvian parents, there is no time requirement to getting citizenship. (However, in order to get citizenship, first you must have a CE (carne de extranjeria), which means that you legally reside in Peru. If you don't have a CE, follow the steps in the next section. Since your parents are Peruvian, you don't have to wait three years, you can do it right after you get your CE.) Below is one way to get citizenship. Other ways, including those for minors, can be found in immigrant visas and naturalisation. This information was taken from migraciones.
  • Form F006.
  • Pay the fee for form F006 and the naturalisation fee at the Banco de la Nacion
  • Solicitud (number 8 in letters to immigration)
  • Your birth cert, legalised by the Peruvian Consulate/Embassy, translated by an official translator, then legalised by RREE.
  • Original and copy of your passport
  • Declaration saying that you are healthy and have no criminal record (numbers 5 and 6 in letters to immigration)
  • Original and copy of your CE (with foreigner's tax paid with up-to-date)
  • Original and copy of your Birth certificate of your Peruvian parent(s)' birth certificate. Must be less than 3 months old. (I'm not sure if they would accept documents from parents who were naturalised Peruvian citizens or not. I know that to register a minor, they will let naturalised Peruvians parents pass on their citizenship.)
  • Copy of your Peruvian parent(s)' valid DNI
  • 4 passport sized photos
  • Document from INTERPOL

CE for Children of Peruvians Over the Age of 18
All payments should be made at the Banco de la Nacion. (This is just one way to get a CE, there are others, see general foreigner information and the information for immigrant visas and naturalisation for other ways.) 
  1. Pay the fee for permission to sign contracts. (Letters to immigrations can be found in letters to immigration.)
  2. Get hired by a company or you talk to one of your friends who has company with a registered RUC, and sign the contract.
  3. Pay the fee to register your contract (ingresar contratos) take it to the Ministerio del Trabajo on Av. El Aire in San Borja, present your birth certificate, your Peruvian parents birth certificate or DNI to prove that you are related to a Peruvian, and the contract signed, they review it and give you the necessary stamp.
  4. Once this is done go to Immigrations and show this to the immigration officer. (He will ask you how you got the contract approved. Show him the proof, you are the son or daughter of a Peruvian. You have to return in 10 days to see whether the visa is ready for pick up. While waiting, do the INTERPOL check about this time so it can be ready once you are a resident.
  5. Follow the steps for getting your carne.
  6. Once you get the carne de extranjeria gather all the docs for the naturalisation process and apply.
People Who Have Received Peruvian Citizenship
Some people from Expat Peru have gotten citizenship. Try contacting them if you have questions. They might be able to help you out.
  • paddington82: American, received unknown
  • sarahdavida: American, received unknown
  • naturegirl: American, January 2009
  • american_in_lima: American, October 2009
  • RobB: American, 2009
  • aqpgeo: American, January 2010
  • wisconsin traveler: American, April 2010
  • Remigius: Dutch, September 2010
  • Alan: Canadian, October 2010
  • markr: British, December 2010
  • DC_20833: December 2010
  • fanning: Dutch, January 2011
  • gerard: British, February 2011
  • Yuyis: Dutch, May 2011

People Who Are Planning on Getting Citizenship
  • MartitaAQP
  • stuart
  • Chiclayo Gringo: American
  • cuymagico: unknown
  • Kelly: American
  • LauraMH: American




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