Wednesday, 9 July 2008

Using Peruvian Documents Abroad

Updated 23 April 2014

For information about using foreign documents in Peru, please see Peru and the Hague Agreement. Speaking Spanish will help you greatly. You'll be treated differently than if you speak English all the time, it'll help you assimilate, and you'll be able to communicate easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, check out Fluenz Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Synergy Spanish.

Apostillisation for Countries in the Hague Agreement
The Hague Agreement is now valid in Peru which mean documents can be apostillised. See Peru and the Hague Agreement for more info. Thanks go to Rudd for the steps below.

  1. You’ll have to go to a notary (you also may have to take it to the Colegio de Notarios after you take it to a notary. Rules constantly change, so ask the notary for more information). The exceptions to this are birth, marriage and death certificates. You take these to RENIEC, not a notary, and have them legalise them.
  2. Then go to Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE). For times, directions, and more information, see Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores (RREE). When presenting your documents for legalizing they ask you for what country. If it is a country that accepts Apostilled documents, they will tell you your document will get an Apostille. This procedure takes about two weeks.
  3. If the country you're going to use it in is not a Spanish speaking country, you'll have to get it translated. Translators will usually notarise and apostillise it as well for a fee. 

Legalisations for Countries Not in the Hague Agreement
Not all countries are part of the Hague Agreement. Canada is just one example. If you want to use Peruvian documents in a country that is not part of the Hague Agreement, you've got a lot of work cut out for you. Below you will find the basic steps, but it's best to ask the embassy of the country where you want to use it.
  1. You’ll have to go to a notary (you also may have to take it to the Colegio de Notarios after you take it to a notary. Rules constantly change, so ask the notary for more information). The exceptions to this are birth, marriage and death certificates. You take these to RENIEC, not a notary, and have them legalise them.
  2. Then go to Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE). For times, directions, and more information, see Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores (RREE).
  3. Go back in a day to pick the legalisation up.
  4. If the country you're going to use it in is not a Spanish speaking country, you'll have to get it translated. Translators will usually notarise and apostillise it as well for a fee.  
  5. Then go to the embassy of the country you're going to use it in. You may also need to get it translated.
  6. Finally, when you get to that country, you will probably also have to get it legalised by the Ministery of Foreign Affiars.




The Ultimate Peru List recommends:

0 comments:

Post a Comment

All comments are moderated and may take a couple days to appear online. Please only click the submit button once. You can also email me at naturegirl321@yahoo.com if you'd like.

FTC Disclosure and Privacy Policy

html

Paperblog